Gardening

Create forsythia seedlings


Question: create forsythia seedlings


If the forsythia pruning branches are kept in water jars, do they put the roots? If so, how long?

Answer: create forsythia seedlings


Dear Diego,
forsythia is a plant that roots with great ease, if you look at shrubs of creeping varieties of forsythia, they often tend to root also for offshoots, in the sense that the hanging branches tend to form roots in the points where they arch so as to touch the ground . That said, usually spring is not the best time to prepare cuttings, and above all, generally, a period of the year is chosen in which the plant is not in complete and full vegetative growth, because it is as if it were already busy preparing buds and flowers, and therefore has less energy to spend on rooting; the best method to make cuttings of forsythia consists in taking the woody pici of the young branches towards the end of the summer, and making them root in a vase, in a mixture of peat and sand in equal limbs, exposed to the weather so that it remains wet and fresh, possibly favoring the rooting by immersing the powder in the rooting hormone before burying it. But these plants root with ease, and therefore it is likely that your twigs in water root without problems, and then you can try to bury them in a good universal soil; generally the practice of making the cuttings root in water is not recommended, because the roots thus produced are thin and delicate, and tend to break at the time of burial, and therefore become vehicles of fungal diseases with great ease. To prevent this from happening, immediately after having buried your cuttings, at the first watering, mix the systemic fungicide with the water you will give to the plants, in order to prevent the possible attack of fungal parasites. If your cuttings do not take root, you can wait a few weeks, until late May, more or less, and try to make others, after all, fortsythics are very vigorous and produce large amounts of branches even in a few spring weeks. Consider that often, whoever has a forsythia hedge, tends to propagate the shrub at the time of pruning, after it has bloomed, simply by burying the freshly pruned stems next to the plant from which they come. So, if the forsythia is so easily buried, I think it is possible that your cuttings placed in the water can also root and survive without problems. The rooting hormone is not so useful if you place the branches in water, because it dilutes in the liquid very rapidly; clear that it also serves so diluted, but the best effect is when used on cuttings to be buried.